New Study PROVES Masks Have Done More Harm Than Good!

In November, a study published by Baruch Vainshelboim, a clinical exercise physiologist, recirculated on the internet recently hypothesizing that masks are ineffective and could have long-term health consequences.

Masks do absolutely nothing to help prevent the spread of COVID-19 and their use is even harmful. According to the recent Stanford study released by the NCBI, which is under the National Institutes of Health.

NIH published a medical hypothesis by Dr Baruch Vainshelboim (Cardiology Division, Veterans Affairs Palo Alto Health Care System/Stanford University, Palo Alto, CA, United States).

“Although, scientific evidence supporting facemasks’ efficacy is lacking, adverse physiological, psychological and health effects are established,” the article states.

In January, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention performed a study and concluded that universal masking is recommended to slow the spread of COVID-19.

The CDC concluded that cloth masks and medical procedure masks substantially reduce exposure from infected wearers and reduce exposure of uninfected wearers — the CDC’s study states that mask mandates were in place in 38 states and DC at the time of publication.

But the researcher disagrees and says not only mask ineffective but could also be causing long-term health problems.

“Both medical and non-medical facemasks are ineffective to reduce human-to-human transmission and infectivity of SARS-CoV-2 and COVID-19,” the article details. “Wearing facemasks has adverse physiological and psychological effects … [and] long-term consequences of wearing facemasks on health are detrimental.”

The research suggests that the long-term practice of wearing facemasks has the “strong potential for devastating health consequences,” and states that masks should be “avoided from use.”

“The existing scientific evidences challenge the safety and efficacy of wearing facemask as preventive intervention for COVID-19,” the article reads. “The data suggest that both medical and non-medical facemasks are ineffective to block human-to-human transmission of viral and infectious disease such SARS-CoV-2 and COVID-19, supporting against the usage of facemasks. Wearing facemasks has been demonstrated to have substantial adverse physiological and psychological effects.”

The NCBI study begins with the following abstract:

Many countries across the globe utilized medical and non-medical facemasks as a non-pharmaceutical intervention for reducing the transmission and infectivity of coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19). Although, scientific evidence supporting facemasks’ efficacy is lacking, adverse physiological, psychological and health effects are established. It has been hypothesized that facemasks have compromised safety and efficacy profile and should be avoided from use. The current article comprehensively summarizes scientific evidence concerning wearing facemasks in the COVID-19 era, providing proper information for public health and decisions making.

The study concludes (emphasis added):

The existing scientific evidences challenge the safety and efficacy of wearing a facemask as preventive intervention for COVID-19. The data suggest that both medical and non-medical facemasks are ineffective to block human-to-human transmission of viral and infectious disease such as SARS-CoV-2 and COVID-19, supporting against the usage of facemasks.

Wearing facemasks has been demonstrated to have substantial adverse physiological and psychological effects. These include hypoxia, hypercapnia, shortness of breath, increased acidity and toxicity, activation of fear and stress response, rise in stress hormones, immunosuppression, fatigue, headaches, a decline in cognitive performance, predisposition for viral and infectious illnesses, chronic stress, anxiety and depression. Long-term consequences of wearing a facemask can cause health deterioration, development and progression of chronic diseases and premature death.

Governments, policymakers and health organizations should utilize a proper and scientific evidence-based approach concerning wearing facemasks, when the latter is considered as a preventive intervention for public health.

The existing scientific evidences challenge the safety and efficacy of wearing facemask as preventive intervention for COVID-19. The data suggest that both medical and non-medical facemasks are ineffective to block human-to-human transmission of viral and infectious disease such SARS-CoV-2 and COVID-19, supporting against the usage of facemasks.

Wearing facemasks has been demonstrated to have substantial adverse physiological and psychological effects. These include hypoxia, hypercapnia, shortness of breath, increased acidity and toxicity, activation of fear and stress response, rise in stress hormones, immunosuppression, fatigue, headaches, a decline in cognitive performance, predisposition for viral and infectious illnesses, chronic stress, anxiety and depression.

Long-term consequences of wearing a facemask can cause health deterioration, development and progression of chronic diseases and premature death. Governments, policymakers and health organizations should utilize a proper and scientific evidence-based approach concerning wearing facemasks, when the latter is considered as a preventive intervention for public health.

“Don’t follow the crowd, let the crowd follow you.” – Margaret Thatcher.

Sources: THE GATEWAY PUNDIT, WSAU, OUTKICK